Biltmore Rose Trials – First Visit

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Champney's PinkThis week Jesse and I took much-needed vacation day and revisited the Biltmore. We were combining a belated wedding anniversary (my accident last month postponed any celebrations) coupled with my first day of judging for the Biltmore Rose Trials. I was terribly nervous about judging, for some reason. I think it’s because anything new gives me butterflies, but also I second guess myself too much, I suppose, and was afraid I would do something “wrong” in my assessments. Jesse had to remind me a bunch of times that my opinion was valid and it was OK to say what I thought about each rose. Gosh.

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Mother of Pearl 2The rose garden was a lot more crowded than I expected on a Tuesday morning. This was only my second visit to the Biltmore and I was in for a bit of a shock. People everywhere. Buses coming and going. And did I mention it was HOT? There was a touch and go moment where I really thought I might just conk out right there in front of all the tourists. That’s OK, it was worth it. There were ROSES!!! Following are the photos I snapped with my cell phone. Enjoy! ♡

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose - Madame BerkeleyMadame Berkely, Tea, 1898

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose - No 1505No 1505 (Floribunda with pretty coloring)

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose - No 1509No 1509 (deliciously fragrant Hybrid Tea)

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Baronne PrevostBaronne Prevost, Hybrid Perpetual, 1842

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Champney's Pink 2Champney’s Pink, Noisette, 1811

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose La FranceLa France, Hybrid Tea, 1867

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Lady of MegginchLady of Megginch, Old Rose Hybrid/David Austin, 2006

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Mother of PearlMother of Pearl, Grandiflora, 2006

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose No 1419No 1419 (exquisite blooms on this Shrub rose)

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose No 1421No 1421 (another lovely Shrub rose)

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose No 1423No 1423 (Shrub with wonderful coloring. You know I love me some single-petaled roses!)

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose No 1427No 1427 (a Climbing rose with very vibrant coloring)

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Paul NeyronPaul Neyron, Hybrid Perpetual, 1869

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Harlow CarrHarlow Carr, Old Rose Hybrid/David Austin, 2004

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose Golden CelebrationGolden Celebration, Leander/David Austin, 1992

Biltmore Rose Garden via Hedgerow Rose

 

17 thoughts on “Biltmore Rose Trials – First Visit

    1. Hi Michaela! It’s funny you mention that, b/c when I was assessing this rose I was thinking how much it looked like an Austin. The trial is set up to allow for “new varieties” i.e. ones that have been in commerce for only a couple of years prior to being included in the trial garden. If you’re interested, you can read more about it here. It’s pretty nifty!

  1. Wow – those roses are amazing. What joy it must be to walk around a garden of roses. So glad you got a chance, and once again, congratulations with being a permanent juror at the Biltmore. Good grief – how exciting is that anyway!

    1. It is SO exciting! It was also so wonderful to be surrounded by roses again. I miss mine so much! If it wasn’t so hot that day we would have spent a lot longer in the garden. Next time…

  2. Oh so lovely and good to know you’re feeling well enough for such an undertaking. The David Austin roses Anne and I planted in my new flower bed this spring have begun to bloom and each is amazing in its own way.
    Keep healing and don’t be too hard on yourself for needing to take some time away from your “to do” list.

    1. How lovely to see some new David Austin roses in bloom in your garden. Thank you for your visit, Sharon!

  3. Wonderful! Thanks for sharing these! I don’t have many roses (only one of my bands survived the winter 🙁 and the rugosas I’ve planted in the ground have such fleeting flowers). I might follow your instructions and try taking some cuttings of some of the David Austins that my mom planted this spring.

    Congratulations on being a judge! Of course your opinion is valid!!

    1. Thanks Anne! Isn’t it so frustrating to lose roses over winter? Been there. A lot.
      Which rugosas did you plant?

  4. I just love the photos… and the roses, of course, they are gorgeous! But the photos look too good to be made with a cell phone. The climbing rose (1427) is simply amazing, the petals look so delicate.

    1. They do look like they’re made of porcelain or something, don’t they?
      And thank you for your comment about the photos…they were taken with my iPhone which I find that I am using more and more since it’s so much easier to carry than my big camera. 😉

  5. Congratulations on your role as juror! That is super exciting! Thanks for giving us a sneak peek into the process. Rose 1419 also caught my eye – it reminded me of “Royal Jubilee” – does it seem similar to you as well? This is my first year growing Royal Jubilee – but it sure looks similar.

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